Cyprus Attractions

Cyprus Attractions

Showcasing some of that fine Mediterranean culture, Cyprus is a paradise for those wishing to escape the conventional British weather and take a well-earned break somewhere warm and friendly. The varied landscape of Cyprus, from cool ocean waters and beaches to rugged and mountainous terrain, means that visitors have an abundance of activities to engage in during their time abroad and the country strives hard to ensure that each and every guest is exclusively catered for.

There are six separate administrative districts on the island, each offering their own unique take on the Cyprian culture. A wonderful example of the contrasted culture is the towns of Ayia Napa and Lefkara. Both popular places to visit, Ayia Napa centres on coastal activities and parties, exhibiting a kinetic nightlife which caters to a younger audience, looking to let loose and party all night long. Sandy beaches and vibrant, colourful bars, Ayia Napa is a thriving and energetic outlet of Cyprian life. Lefkara, however, is a beautiful and picturesque village, perfect for those seeking a more reserved getaway. With a selection of fine museums and monasteries, Lefkara offers visitors the chance to relax and sample some traditional dishes, such as mpourekia, an anari-filled pastry.

As an island popular with tourists due to its wondrous coastline, it is no surprise that the resort towns are usually packed with visitors. However, time should be taken to explore the rest of the island. Nicosia, the island's capital, is a very attractive city located in the centre of the island. Places of note include the Cyprus Museum and the Byzantine Museum, both displaying the country's proud and significant past. Elsewhere, those wishing to indulge in a bit of history can also visit Hamam Omerye, the ancient city spa which dates back to the 14th century.

Explorers may find the Troodos Mountain range to be the ideal hiking experience. The mountains, situated south-west of Nicosia, offer a variety of trails and routes which can be braved by those seeking a more arduous adventure. A collection of quaint villages are dotted around the routes as a means of relaxation and during the winter months, there's even the possibility of skiing.

The culture of the country is incredibly intrinsic and revolves around the nation's people. The food, such as Halloumi, a unique Cypriot cheese, and Cypriot Meze, is afforded a great deal of prestige and pride. The people are a friendly group who invest a lot in their home country and actively set up stalls in bustling marketplaces, offering some fine items such as Cypriot wine, jewellery, drinks and specific art forms, such as lacework, that epitomise the colourful, hard-working fashion of Cyprus as a whole.

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